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List of cat poisons C - D.

Calciferol

Is an ingredient contained in rat and mouse poison, which in turn is poisonous to our cats. It is recommended to keep all of your cats away from any rat/ mouse poison or bait when it is laid down or stored. Cover the poison over to stop larger animals accessing it. Even if you are advised that the poison is not palatable to cats, beware, our cats have very strange tastes and will consume the most unpalatable of substances. Likewise keep your cat away from any dead or dying rodents as they also may be inadvertently poisoned.

Clinical Signs: Loss of appetite/refusal of food, arching of back, drinking and urinating a lot, listlessness, diarrhoea, or constipation.

Carbamates

See 'Insecticides'

Keep cats way from areas where these substances are being sprayed, laid down or placed on bait; make sure they do not have access to open containers of insecticides. Keeping fresh drinking water available at all times will prevent the need for cats to find other sources of liquid to drink to quench their thirst. Keep cats' coats clean and free from any of these compounds, taking care to wash off any detergent used to remove the poison, many cats have been poisoned through licking the detergent/compound used to wash off the original poison. These compounds will have an affect in disrupting the nervous system; they cause an excess of the chemical acetylchlorine to accumulate in the body, which in turn affects the normal transmitting of nerves. As always, emergency veterinary care should be sought if you suspect your cat or cat has been exposed to these substances.

Clinical Signs: Abdominal disorders, including vomiting/diarrhoea, pain, loss of appetite, muscular tremors/ incoordination, increased dribbling, difficulty in breathing, paralysis, convulsions, coma, and death.

Carbon Monoxide

Carbon Monoxide is a poisonous gas which can be found emitted from car exhaust fumes or solid fuel/oil/calor gas burning appliance, often in rooms with poor ventilation, the whole family could be at risk, but quite often cats are more likely to be at risk due to being left for longer periods in confined spaces. Check that all appliances are regularly serviced and rooms are well ventilated. Do not leave your cat even for a short period confined in garages or sheds.

Clinical Signs: Weakness, collapse, blindness/deafness, difficulty in breathing, bluish mucous membrane (look at the gums, which should normally be a health pink colour) coma, death.

Chlorate

Keep cats way from areas where these substances are being used or sprayed; make sure they do not have access to open containers of insecticides. Keeping fresh drinking water available at all times will prevent the need for cats to find other sources of liquid to drink to quench their thirst. Keep cats' coats clean and free from any of these compounds, taking care to wash off any detergent used to remove the poison, many cats have been poisoned through licking the detergent/compound used to wash off the original poison.

Clinical Signs: Listlessness, depression, pain displayed in the abdominal area, blood present in the faeces and urine, blue or brownish coloured mucous membranes (check the gums, which should normally be a healthy pink colour).

Chlorophacinone

See 'Wafarin'

Chlorophacinone is an ingredient contained in rat and mouse poison, which in turn is poisonous to our cats. It is recommended to keep all of your cats away from any rat/ mouse poison or bait when it is laid down or stored. Cover the poison over to stop larger animals accessing it. Even if you are advised that the poison is not palatable to cats, beware, our cats have very strange tastes and will consume the most unpalatable of substances. Likewise keep your cat away from any dead or dying rodents as they also may be inadvertently poisoned.

Clinical Signs: Pale mucous membranes, cold extremities, coughing, possibly coughing up blood, increased respiratory rate or difficulty in breathing, bleeding gums, vomiting, or vomiting up blood, blood passed in the urine, diarrhoea, blood passed in the faces.

Cigars and Cigarettes

The nicotine in cigars and cigarettes can prove toxic to our cats and cats. Ensure that all leftover ends or butts are appropriately disposed of. Likewise keep all packets away from them.

Clinical Signs: Dribbling, vomiting, may have diarrhoea and show abdominal pain. Later on their muscle s may become weak, twitch, convulsions, death.

Coumachlor

See 'Wafarin'

Coumachlor is an ingredient contained in rat and mouse poison, which in turn is poisonous to our cats. It is recommended to keep all of your cats away from any rat / mouse poison or bait when it is laid down or stored. Cover the poison over to stop larger animals accessing it. Even if you are advised that the poison is not palatable to cats, beware, our cats have very strange tastes and will consume the most unpalatable of substances. Likewise keep your cat away from any dead or dying rodents as they also may be inadvertently poisoned.

Clinical Signs: Pale mucous membranes, cold extremities, coughing, possibly coughing up blood, increased respiratory rate or difficulty in breathing, bleeding gums, vomiting, or vomiting up blood, blood passed in the urine, diarrhoea, blood passed in the faces.

Coumatetrayl

Coumatetrayl is an ingredient contained in rat and mouse poison, which in turn is poisonous to our cats. It is recommended to keep all of your cats away from any rat / mouse poison or bait when it is laid down or stored. Cover the poison over to stop larger animals accessing it. Even if you are advised that the poison is not palatable to cats, beware, our cats have very strange tastes and will consume the most unpalatable of substances. Likewise keep your cat away from any dead or dying rodents as they also may be inadvertently poisoned.

Clinical Signs: Pale mucous membranes, cold extremities, coughing, possibly coughing up blood, increased respiratory rate or difficulty in breathing, bleeding gums, vomiting, or vomiting up blood, blood passed in the urine, diarrhoea, blood passed in the faces.

Creosote

See 'Phenol'

Cyanide

Cyanide is an extremely toxic and dangerous compound; one of its uses is to destroy wasp's nests. If they come into contact, dogs will immediately suffer from respiratory problems and fall into a coma. Emergency veterinary treatment should be sought.

Detergents

This large range of compounds are normally used for domestic/commercial use and can include a range of products ranging from bleaches, toilet cleaners (beware animals drinking from toilets as a source of drinking water), detergents and caustics, these compounds are corrosive and contain either acids or alkalis which will destroy tissues upon contact, that in turn dissolve through the tissue membranes and are absorbed into the bloodstream which as well as causing local tissue injury will cause general illness to a variety of body systems. So depending on the substance injury can occur from a mild local irritation (many washing powder detergents to severe internal disease (pine oils and others). It is recommended to flush the affected area with plain warm water to wash the chemical away and then seek urgent veterinary attention.

Diesel Fuel

See 'Petrol'

Difenacoum

See 'Wafarin'

Is an ingredient contained in rat and mouse poison, which in turn is poisonous to our cats. It is recommended to keep all of your cats away from any rat / mouse poison or bait when it is laid down or stored. Cover the poison over to stop larger animals accessing it. Even if you are advised that the poison is not palatable to cats, beware, our cats have very strange tastes and will consume the most unpalatable of substances. Likewise keep your cat away from any dead or dying rodents as they also may be inadvertently poisoned.

Clinical Signs: Pale mucous membranes, cold extremities, coughing, possibly coughing up blood, increased respiratory rate or difficulty in breathing, bleeding gums, vomiting, or vomiting up blood, blood passed in the urine, diarrhoea, blood passed in the faces.

Dinitro Compounds

See 'Insecticides' & 'Herbicides'

Found in insecticides and herbicides. Keep cats way from areas where these substances are being used, sprayed or put on bait; make sure they do not have access to open containers of insecticides. Keeping fresh drinking water available at all times will prevent the need for cats to find other sources of liquid to drink to quench their thirst. Keep cats' coats clean and free from any of these compounds, taking care to wash off any detergent used to remove the poison, many cats have been poisoned through licking the detergent/compound used to wash off the original poison.

Clinical Signs: Raised temperature, loss of appetite/refusal of food, listlessness/depression/dull, increased drinking and respiratory rate, difficulty in breathing, death.

Diphacinone

See 'Wafarin'

Diphacinone is an ingredient contained in rat and mouse poison, which in turn is poisonous to our cats. It is recommended to keep all of your cats away from any rat / mouse poison or bait when it is laid down or stored. Cover the poison over to stop larger animals accessing it. Even if you are advised that the poison is not palatable to cats, beware, our cats have very strange tastes and will consume the most unpalatable of substances. Likewise keep your cat away from any dead or dying rodents as they also may be inadvertently poisoned.

Clinical Signs: Pale mucous membranes, cold extremities, coughing, possibly coughing up blood, increased respiratory rate or difficulty in breathing, bleeding gums, vomiting, or vomiting up blood, blood passed in the urine, diarrhoea, blood passed in the faces, abdominal

Diquat

See 'Insecticides' & 'Herbicides'

Found in insecticides and fungicides. Keep cats way from areas where these substances are being sprayed; make sure they do not have access to open containers of insecticides. Keeping fresh drinking water available at all times will prevent the need for cats to find other sources of liquid to drink to quench their thirst. Keep cats' coats clean and free from any of these compounds, taking care to wash off any detergent used to remove the poison, many cats have been poisoned through licking the detergent/compound used to wash off the original poison.

Clinical Signs: Raised temperature, loss of appetite/refusal of food, listlessness/depression/dull, increased drinking and respiratory rate, difficulty in breathing, death.

Disinfectants

This large range of compounds are normally used for domestic/commercial use and can include a range of products ranging from bleaches, toilet cleaners (beware animals drinking from toilets as a source of drinking water), detergents and caustics, these compounds are corrosive and contain either acids or alkalis which will destroy tissues upon contact, that in turn dissolve through the tissue membranes and are absorbed into the bloodstream which as well as causing local tissue injury will cause general illness to a variety of body systems. So depending on the substance injury can occur from a mild local irritation (many washing powder detergents to severe internal disease (pine oils and others). It is recommended to flush the affected area with plain warm water to wash the chemical away and then seek urgent veterinary attention.

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