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List of Dog Poisons P - Z.

Paint

See 'Lead'

Paracetamol

See 'Human Medicines'

Paracetamol is a drug normally given to humans for the treatment of pain. Although a lot of drugs used today in human have been tested and are licensed for use in our animals, there are still a lot of drugs that can be harmful if we use them in our dogs. Paracetamol, even if given in small doses can prove fatal in our dogs, dogs are particularly sensitive to paracetamol. Keep all drugs bought or prescribed for human use, away from your dogs. Only give medication under the direction of your veterinary surgeon.

Clinical Signs: Vomiting, not eating, dull, incoordination, convulsions.

Petrol / Paraffin oils Kerosene / diesel / white spirit

If in contact with the dog or dog's skin can cause skin irritations. If your dog or dog licks the fluid can cause dribbling, vomiting, diarrhoea, muscle tremors/twitching and convulsions. If your dog or dog inhales the vapours it can cause degrees of respiratory irritation, muscular twitching, dilated pupils and convulsions, leading to death. Keep your dog away from all containers containing these fuels, while using these oils and always clear up spillages quickly.

Paraquat

...is a substance found in herbicides. Keep dogs way from areas where these substances are being used or sprayed; make sure they do not have access to open containers of herbicides. Keeping fresh drinking water available at all times will prevent the need for dogs to find other sources of liquid to drink to quench their thirst. Keep dogs' coats clean and free from any of these compounds, taking car to wash off any detergent used to remove the poison, many dogs have been poisoned through licking the detergent/compound used to wash off the original poison.

Phenol

These include, tar, creosote, carbolic and pitch. Poisoning with these compounds will be identified by a distinctive odour, which can be detected on the cats skin, lips or other areas of the body. Phenols can be absorbed through the animals skin, so wash off any contaminant from the cats and cats skin with water and seek immediate veterinary attention. Keep all containers and spillages away from your cat.

Clinical Signs: Presence of distinctive odour, vomiting, abdominal pain, seizures, tremors, and respiratory failure.

Phosphorus

Phosphorus is an ingredient found in rat/mouse poison. It is recommended to keep all of your dogs away from any rat/ mouse poison or bait when it is laid down or stored. Cover the poison over to stop larger animals accessing it. Even if you are advised that the poison is not palatable to dogs, beware, our dogs have very strange tastes and will consume the most unpalatable of substances. Likewise keep your dog away from any dead or dying rodents as they also may be inadvertently poisoned.

Pitch

See 'Phenol'

Plants

There are hundreds of plants including houseplants, which are potentially poisonous to our dogs. To list them all would be too numerous, so we have included some common toxic varieties. However the number of reports of actual animals becoming seriously ill from eating plants is more infrequent than form being poisoned by household products or drugs. The best advice is to contact your vet if you are concerned if your dog has eaten them. Preventing them from eating plants when they are young is the best deterrent.

Poinsettias, ivy and mistletoe are dangerous plants and their toxic potential is dangerous, however they very rarely cause signs of illness if your dog eats them.

The Japanese Yew, otherwise known as Yew, Spreading English Yew or Canada Yew is an exotic ornamental plant and it is extremely poisonous. Your dog only need to eat 1/10th of 1% of it's own bodyweight to obtain a toxic dose. The toxin found in the Yew is an alkaloid and will suppress the electrical activity of the heart. Clinical signs include: incoordination, tremors, diarrhoea and collapse.

The Araceae Family, which include the common names: Tuberous begonia, wax begonia, water plant, peace lily, etc are house plants which contain compounds called oxalates, These oxalates can accumulate in various internal organs of the animals bodies which in turn can release chemical into the system which may cause an allergic reaction. Fortunately the plant does cause pain and irritation on chewing, however persistent chewers through boredom or behavioural problems may be a risk.

The Rhododendrons, including lily of the valley, laurel, azalea, foxgloves etc all contain cardiac glycosides, drugs which are used in the treatment of heart disease in humans and animals, digitalis is derived from the foxglove plant. Dogs or dogs ingesting these plants may be at risk. Signs include: Vomiting, diarrhoea, collapse or possibly death from heart failure.

The Nightshades, including Chinese lanterns, Christmas cherry, ornamental pepper all contain toxins called solanines, which may affect either the brain or the stomach. Different toxins are presenting different plants. Solanines affecting the stomach will produce clinical signs such as: vomiting, diarrhoea, and abdominal pain. Soloanines affecting the brain will produce clinical signs such as increased dribbling, drowsiness, weakness, trembling, difficulty in breathing and collapse.

Rat poison

Rodenticides are classified according to the their ingredients and the way they act upon their intended target, examples include the anti coagulant poisons, such as wafarin, which acts upon the targets blood clotting mechanism, strychnine which acts upon the nervous system and produces symptoms such as incoordination, seizures, neck stiffness and cholecalciferol which can cause heart failure. See list of individual ingredients. It is recommended to keep all of your dogs away from any rat/ mouse poison or bait when it is laid down or stored. Cover the poison over to stop larger animals accessing it. Even if you are advised that the poison is not palatable to dogs, beware, our dogs have very strange tastes and will consume the most unpalatable of substances. Likewise keep your dog away from any dead or dying rodents as they also may be inadvertently poisoned.

Rodenticides

Rodenticides are classified according to the their ingredients and the way they act upon their intended target, examples include the anti coagulant poisons such as wafarin, which acts upon the targets blood clotting mechanism, strychnine which acts upon the nervous system and produces symptoms such as incoordination, seizures, neck stiffness and cholecalciferol which can cause heart failure. See list of individual ingredients. It is recommended to keep all of your dogs away from any rat/ mouse poison or bait when it is laid down or stored. Cover the poison over to stop larger animals accessing it. Even if you are advised that the poison is not palatable to dogs, beware, our dogs have very strange tastes and will consume the most unpalatable of substances. Likewise keep your dog away from any dead or dying rodents as they also may be inadvertently poisoned.

Slug Bait

See 'Molluicides'

Snake Venom

See 'Adder Bites'

Sodium chlorate

Sodium chlorate is a herbicide. Keep dogs way from areas where these substances are being used or sprayed; make sure they do not have access to open containers of herbicides. Keeping fresh drinking water available at all times will prevent the need for dogs to find other sources of liquid to drink to quench their thirst. Keep your dogs' coats clean and free from any of these compounds, taking care to wash off any detergent used to remove the poison, many dogs have been poisoned through licking the detergent/compound used to wash off the original poison. Seek immediate veterinary advice if you suspect your dog has been exposed to any herbicide.

Strychnine

Strychnine is a rodenticide, which acts upon the nervous system and produces symptoms such as incoordination, seizures, neck and leg stiffness. It is recommended to keep all of your dogs away from any rat / mouse poison or bait when it is laid down or stored. Cover the poison over to stop larger animals accessing it. Even if you are advised that the poison is not palatable to dogs, beware, our dogs have very strange tastes and will consume the most unpalatable of substances. Likewise keep your dog away from any dead or dying rodents as they also may be inadvertently poisoned.

Tar

See 'Phenol'

Thallium

Thallium is an ingredient found in rat/mouse poison. It is recommended to keep all of your dogs away from any rat/ mouse poison or bait when it is laid down or stored. Cover the poison over to stop larger animals accessing it. Even if you are advised that the poison is not palatable to dogs, beware, our dogs have very strange tastes and will consume the most unpalatable of substances. Likewise keep your dog away from any dead or dying rodents as they also may be inadvertently poisoned.

Toadstools

Because of the large variety of mushrooms and toadstool around and the different variety of toxic fungi. Dogs should be deterred from eating any species of fungi (mushroom and toadstools) If you suspect ingestion has occurred take along any remnants / samples of the variety of fungi to your vets, for immediate veterinary attention. Care must be take to use protective clothing if handling any suspected poisonous fungi.

Wafarin

Wafarin is an anti coagulant poison, which acts upon the targets blood clotting mechanism, It interferes with the animals ability to synthesise Vitamin K, which plays a vital role in the animals clotting mechanism, The body requires clotting to take place many times during the day and night and not just when the animal bleed externally, consequently, over a period of 3-5 days after eating wafarin, a major bleed may take place internally and clinical signs may include: dullness, weakness, pale mucous membrane ( look at he gums) difficulty on breathing, nosebleeds, blood in the urine/faeces. If you suspect your dog or dog has eaten this type of poison, obtain treatment straight away, if caught early enough the animal can be given the appropriate treatment. It is recommended to keep all of your dogs away from any rat/ mouse poison or bait when it is laid down or stored. Cover the poison over to stop larger animals accessing it. Even if you are advised that the poison is not palatable to dogs, beware, our dogs have very strange tastes and will consume the most unpalatable of substances. Likewise keep your dog away from any dead or dying rodents as they also may be inadvertently poisoned.

Wasp stings

Occasionally dogs that have been stung by wasps may go into severe shock and collapse (known as anaphylactic shock) if they are allergic to the sting. Immediate veterinary attention is required if this is the case. Likewise if the tongue is stung it will require emergency treatment to treat the swelling, which could block the animals' airway. Common areas to be stung are the mouth if the dog tries to catch the insect or the paws, if the dog plays with a drowsy wasp. If the wasp sting is still present you can try and remove it with a pair of tweezers and antihistamine cream can be applied. If the dog is stung in the mouth bathe the area with a diluted solution of vinegar bicarbonate. Observe the area for signs of swelling or contact your veterinary practice if your dog is in great pain or distress.

Clinical Signs: Vomiting, diarrhoea, swelling, respiratory difficulties, collapse, death.

Zinc Phosphide

Zinc phosphide is an ingredient found in Rat/mouse poison It is recommended to keep all of your dogs away from any rat/ mouse poison or bait when it is laid down or stored. Cover the poison over to stop larger animals accessing it. Even if you are advised that the poison is not palatable to dogs, beware, our dogs have very strange tastes and will consume the most unpalatable of substances. Likewise keep your dog away from any dead or dying rodents as they also may be inadvertently poisoned.

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