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List of dog poisons A - B.

Acrolein

Overheated oil or fat may poison your dog if they find it and consume it. Unfortunately, dogs do find this extremely palatable so are at risk. Deep fat fryers, which have not been emptied or cleaned can be a dangerous source, or if you decant any used oil or fat from cooking can also be found in fridges or pantries.

Clinical Signs: High temperature/fever, difficulty in breathing, blue tinged mucous membranes (See your dogs gums, which are normally a healthy pink colour) collapse, death.

Adder Bites

Adders (Vipera berus) are one of the only poisonous snakes found in the U.K's natural habitat. They hibernate from mid October to the end of February in England. Mating season is April to early May and new young are born between August and early September. Although they will shy away from busy area, they will attack if disturbed, especially nosy dogs rummaging in their territory. Immediate veterinary care is advised if your dog is bitten. Keep your dog on a lead and away from known adder habitats.

Clinical Signs: Sudden swelling, hyperexcitabilty, tremors, loss of coordination, dilated pupils, collapse, death.

Aflatoxin

Aflatoxin is an ingredient contained in contaminated grain, which in turn is poisonous to our dogs. It is recommended to keep all of your dogs away from any contaminated grain designed to poison other animals when it is laid down or stored. Cover the poison over to stop larger animals accessing it. Even if you are advised that the poison is not palatable to dogs, beware, our dogs have very strange tastes and will consume the most unpalatable of substances. Likewise keep your dog away from any dead or dying rodents as they also may be inadvertently poisoned.

Clinical Signs: Not eating, refusing food, listlessness, dullness, weight loss, swollen abdomen, jaundice (yellow tinted mucous members, look at the white area of the eye).

Alphachlorolose

Alphachlorolose is an ingredient contained in rat and mouse poison, which in turn is poisonous to our dogs. It is recommended to keep all of your dogs away from any rat/ mouse poison or bait when it is laid down or stored. Cover the poison over to stop larger animals accessing it. Even if you are advised that the poison is not palatable to dogs, beware, our dogs have very strange tastes and will consume the most unpalatable of substances. Likewise keep your dog away from any dead or dying rodents as they also may be inadvertently poisoned.

Clinical Signs: In coordination, cold extremities, coma.

Antifreeze

Otherwise known as 'Ethylene glycol' is normally placed in car radiators in the winter. Unfortunately poisoning with antifreeze is common as it has a very sweet taste and any spilled antifreeze may be licked by dogs in quantities sufficient to cause extreme sickness and even death. Damage is usually done to the kidneys If you are storing antifreeze in the garage / workshop / shed, keep containers properly sealed and out of reach of your dogs. Clear up any spillages immediately.

Clinical Signs: Depression, restlessness, in coordination, convulsions, coma and death.

Antu

Antu is an ingredient contained in rat and mouse poison, which in turn is poisonous to our dogs. It is recommended to keep all of your dogs away from any rat/ mouse poison or bait when it is laid down or stored. Cover the poison over to stop larger animals accessing it. Even if you are advised that the poison is not palatable to dogs, beware, our dogs have very strange tastes and will consume the most unpalatable of substances. Likewise keep your dog away from any dead or dying rodents as they may be inadvertently poisoned.

Clinical Signs: Pale mucous membranes, cold extremities, coughing, possibly coughing up blood, increased respiratory rate or difficulty in breathing, bleeding gums, vomiting, or vomiting up blood, blood passed in the urine, diarrhoea, blood passed in the faces, abdominal

Arsenic

Arsenic is an ingredient, which can be used in a number of poison's and toxic substances including rat / mouse poisons and herbicides. Keep all poisons away from your dogs when using them or storing in sheds or garages. Dogs will find the most abhorrent substances palatable.

Clinical Signs: Listlessness, dull, weak, increased dribbling (salivation), Abdominal disorders, including diarrhoea, vomiting, showing pain, collapse, death.

Aspirin

See 'Human Medicines'

Aspirin is a drug normally given to humans for the treatment of pain. Although a lot of drugs used today in human have been tested and are licensed for use in our animals, there are still a lot of drugs that can be harmful if we use them in our dogs. Aspirin, even if given in small doses can prove fatal in our dogs, dogs are particularly sensitive to aspirin. Keep all drugs bought or prescribed for human use away from your dogs. Only give medication under the direction of your veterinary surgeon.

Clinical Signs: Vomiting, not eating, dull, incoordination, convulsions.

Barbiturates

Barbiturates which can be known as sedatives or hypnotics, designed to depress the activity of the central nervous system. Although they are prescribed for use in some species, in a number of disease conditions. Dogs are at risk of poisoning through eating their owners prescribed tablets. If found and taken by dogs their affect could prove fatal. Seek immediate veterinary care.

Clinical Signs: Depression, sleepiness, in coordinated, dilated pupils, depressed respiratory and heat rate, coma.

Bee Stings

Bee stings Occasionally dogs that have been stung by bees may go into severe shock and collapse (known as anaphylactic shock) if they are allergic to the sting. Immediate veterinary attention is required if this is the case. Likewise if the tongue is stung it will require emergency treatment to treat the swelling, which could block the animals' airway. Common areas to be stung are the mouth if the dog tries to catch the insect or the paws, if the dog plays with a drowsy bee. If the bee sting is still present you can try and remove it with a pair of tweezers and antihistamine cream can be applied. If the dog is stung in the mouth bathe the area with a diluted solution of sodium bicarbonate. Observe the area for signs of swelling or contact your veterinary practice if your dog is in great pain or distress.

Clinical Signs: Vomiting. Diarrhoea, swelling, respiratory difficulties, collapse, death.

Benzoic Acid

Benzoic Acid is an antiseptic which is active against bacteria and fungi, it can be used either as a food preservative, a preservative in some pharmaceutical preparations or as a treatment of fungal infections of the skin. If you suspect your animal may have been poisoned or exposed to any commercially produced food, pharmaceutical preparation or preparation to treat fungal infections. Take along these items to your vet, together with the packaging to assist them with the diagnosis.

Clinical Signs: Hyperexcitabilty, aggression, increased dribbling, collapse, coma, death.

Berries

Berries commonly found in your garden may be poisonous to your dog. Plants, which produce berries or seeds, may be attractive to your dog, especially the younger animal. Mistletoe, Holly, Laburnum, all plants that may be poisonous to your dog.

Brodifacoum

See 'Wafarin'

Brodifacoum is an ingredient contained in rat and mouse poison, which in turn is poisonous to our dogs. It is recommended to keep all of your dogs away from any rat/ mouse poison or bait when it is laid down or stored. Cover the poison over to stop larger animals accessing it. Even if you are advised that the poison is not palatable to dogs, beware, our dogs have very strange tastes and will consume the most unpalatable of substances. Likewise keep your dog away from any dead or dying rodents as they also may be inadvertently poisoned.

Clinical Signs: Pale mucous membranes, cold extremities, coughing, possibly coughing up blood, increased respiratory rate or difficulty in breathing, bleeding gums, vomiting, or vomiting up blood, blood passed in the urine, diarrhoea, blood passed in the faces, abdominal

Bromadioline

See 'Wafarin'

Bromadioline is an ingredient contained in rat and mouse poison, which in turn is poisonous to our dogs. It is recommended to keep all of your dogs away from any rat/ mouse poison or bait when it is laid down or stored. Cover the poison over to stop larger animals accessing it. Even if you are advised that the poison is not palatable to dogs, beware, our dogs have very strange tastes and will consume the most unpalatable of substances. Likewise keep your dog away from any dead or dying rodents as they also may be inadvertently poisoned.

Clinical Signs: Pale mucous membranes, cold extremities, coughing, possibly coughing up blood, increased respiratory rate or difficulty in breathing, bleeding gums, vomiting, or vomiting up blood, blood passed in the urine, diarrhoea, blood passed in the faces, abdominal

Bulbs

Bulbs such as daffodils and snowdrops are also potentially poisonous to our dogs. Be aware of newly planted bulbs or animals that enjoy digging, keep dogs away from greenhouses or sheds, where bulbs may be stored.

Bypyridyl

Bypyridyl is a substance found in herbicides. Keep dogs way from areas where these substances are being used or sprayed; make sure they do not have access to open containers of herbicides. Keeping fresh drinking water available at all times will prevent the need for dogs to find other sources of liquid to drink to quench their thirst. Keep dogs' coats clean and free from any of these compounds, taking car to wash off any detergent used to remove the poison, many dogs have been poisoned through licking the detergent/compound used to wash off the original poison.

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